Egyptian Mummies: Exploring Ancient Lives – Montreal Museum of Fine Arts From September 14, 2019 to February 2, 2020

The exhibition Egyptian Mummies: Exploring Ancient Lives has been open to the public for almost two months. Egyptian Mummies: Exploring Ancient Lives already more than 75 000 visitors! The exhibition includes more than 200 artefacts from ancient Egypt. Figurines, steles and vases are among the treasures that help to better understand the burial rituals of these rich civilizations. Recent research on the mummies in this exhibition reveals new information including their diets and illnesses.

Making its North American premiere at the MMFA, this internationally acclaimed exhibition produced by the British Museum reconstructs the lives of six people who lived along the Nile, using an innovative approach that combines the arts and science. Accompanied by digital visualizations and more than 200 objects from ancient Egypt, these encounters offer a portrait of who these individuals were, presented with the utmost respect. Age, beliefs and the diseases they suffered from: each mummy has a story to tell.

Among the mummies on display are Nestawedjat, who was married and from a wealthy family. Tamut was resting in a coffin presenting her as a young woman even though she was probably older. Irthorru’s body was mummified around 600 BC. The other three mummies in the exhibition are anonymous. We know that they came from a priestess, a child about two years old and a young man between 17 and 20 years old.

Another is Irthorru. Here is his story: My name was Irthorru and I lived in Akhmin where I was very busy. I divided my time between several temples and served many gods including Min, god of fertility, as well as Horus and Isis. As a priest and master of secrets, I was in charge of all religious instruction and deity worship.

My role as a priest offered me several advantages. Priests could share offerings after presenting them to the gods, thereby enjoying bread, meat and fruit on a daily basis.

To be able to serve the gods, I had to stay pure and wash twice a day and twice a night. I also had to shave my whole body and observe strict sexual abstinence in addition to following dietary restrictions.

I died between the ages of 35 and 49 and my embalmed body dates back to 600 BCE. My face was covered by a gilded mask to ensure its eternal perfection.

Location: 1380, Sherbrooke Street O

Dates: From September 14, 2019 to February 2, 2020

Museum Hours:

Monday Closed
Tuesday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Wednesday * 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.*
Thursday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Admission Fees:

GENERAL ADMISSION* $24
AGES 21 TO 30 * $16
AGES 0 TO 20 * FREE
VIP MEMBERS FREE
WEDNESDAY EVENINGS (STARTING AT 5 P.M.) * $12
THE FIRST SUNDAY OF THE MONTH DISCOVERY EXHIBITIONS AND COLLECTIONS : FREE ADMISSION
ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR EXHIBITION : $ 24

Website: www.mbam.qc.ca

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