Purpose meets design at SXSW

The
countdown to the 2020 Conference has switched from months to weeks, and we’re
working hard to make March magical for you with more compelling content during
the second half of the event. 

A notable inclusion is the Design Track, which explores a central building block of all
the ideas and industries represented at SXSW. Running from Monday, March 16 – Friday, March 20,
this track will share concepts, insights and tools for design-centered thinking
that can make your projects, whatever they may be, better from the ground up.

Here are some of the most surprising
and essential Design sessions we’re looking forward to this year:

  • The Accidental Ethicist: Making AI Human-Centered
    (March 18): As designers, we’re now facing the fact that we’re now all
    accidental ethicists. This session will build on your existing knowledge and
    give you new ways to frame problems, design user behavior, and help to make AI
    more explainable — and more ethical.
  • Behind China’s Great
    Firewall: Tech Culture and UX
    (March 19): Jessica Shen of
    R/GA explains how culture and government influence have affected UX and design
    trends in China. See how apps break western design conventions, learn how
    Chinese users interact with brands, and get a glimpse of e-commerce and
    entertainment within this parallel tech universe.
  • Designing AI Products and Services
    (March 19): This session will train UX designers to recognize opportunities to
    use AI. Led by Qian Yang and John Zimmerman of Carnegie Mellon, this
    presentation will cover AI’s capabilities, design patterns, plus new design
    methods.
  • Designing the Waymo Driver
    (March 19): This session explores how Waymo approaches industrial design for
    self-driving technology, details its journey from 2009 to now, and offers an
    exclusive look into the design behind its latest vehicle platform.
  • Emerging Trends in
    Design, Culture & Leadership
    (March 20): InVision’s
    Head Design Evangelist Stephen Gates shares his knowledge of the biggest trends
    that will impact your work, products, culture, and leadership over the next few
    years.
  • Old People are Cool, Design for Them Sucks
    (March 20): The last hiding place for consistently terrible design might be the
    things made to serve the 55 million Americans over 65. Speakers include Don
    Norman, Director of the Design Lab at the University of California, San Diego.
  • Peace, Equity and
    Liberation by Design
    (March 20): In this discussion, panelists
    including Antionette D. Carroll of Creative Reaction Lab will share how they
    have developed new social innovation design processes that have been
    foundational to creating peace, liberation and equitable products, programs or
    initiatives.
  • Product Prototyping for the Queer Community
    (March 19): The road to serving the design needs of the traditionally marginalized
    doesn’t come easy. Learn how brands have developed products that encourage us
    to create a new aspirational image with room for our unique and diverse best
    selves.
  • Sound and Cities:
    Designing for a Better Future
    (March 20): Join David van
    der Leer of DVDL DD and other experts on architecture and design, environmental
    research and music composition in a discussion of how sound impacts everything
    from productivity and attention to physical wellbeing. Leave with new ideas on
    how to design for a better sonic future in our urban communities.
  • Using Science Fiction to Inspire Innovation
    (March 20): Many breakthroughs in design have been inspired by narratives in
    science fiction. Learn how our speakers use sci-fi storytelling as a model for
    disruptive innovation.

Build success through design and
explore all 22 Conference Tracks by purchasing your badge now. There’s still time to save on the
walk-up rate, and special discounts available for students
and groups
of ten or more. After you register, book your room via SXSW Housing & Travel and take
advantage of lower end-of-the-week pricing on many downtown hotels.

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